The mission of new startup Colossal, which has raised $15 million to date, is to genetically reengineer a cold-resistant elephant with all the core biological traits of the extinct woolly mammoth.

Monoclonal antibodies are playing a key therapeutic role in the treatment of some Covid-19 patients, but new research suggests that nanobodies derived from llamas could provide an alternative to monoclonal antibodies through a more effective delivery method—inhalation.

Llama antibodies could soon be playing a role in the global fight against Covid-19, if clinical trials being conducted by a Belgian biomedical start-up live up to their early promise.

If you think you have Covid-19, it might be best to stay away from your pets, says the author of a Dutch study that found a surprising number of dogs and cats may be getting infected.

The U.S. intelligence community on May 27 acknowledged its agencies had two theories on where the coronavirus originated, with two agencies believing it emerged naturally from human contact with infected animals and a third embracing a possible laboratory accident as the source of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration placed a clinical hold on Larimar Therapeutics’ lead Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) asset, CTI-1601, after the company reported deaths in the highest dose levels of a nonhuman primate toxicology study.

Russia registered the world’s first vaccine against Covid-19 for animals, the country’s agriculture safety watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor said on March 31.

A joint WHO-China study on the origins of Covid-19 says the virus was probably transmitted from bats to humans through another animal, and that a lab leak was “extremely unlikely” as a cause, the Associated Press reported on March 29.

Belgium-based ExeVir announced a $50 million Series A to take the 9-month-old startup’s lead antibody compound XVR011 into a global Phase Ib/II clinical study soon, representing the first in-human trials using a unique, llama-derived antibody.

A recent study published in Science Translational Medicine shows that a new flu vaccine appears to protect monkeys against influenza strains that are likely to cause a global pandemic, giving researchers hope that this vaccine could hold the key to providing a future universal flu vaccine for humans.