Gilead Sciences is expected to report data from a clinical trial of the antiviral drug remdesivir against COVID-19 soon, and is considered by some analysts to be the closest hope for a treatment.

A summary of daily biopharma industry news regarding the novel coronavirus trending on March 27, 2020, with the FDA now working with 220 test developers.

As the world waits with bated breath for a treatment for COVID-19, all eyes are on Gilead Science’s antiviral drug remdesivir as a potential candidate.

An international team of researchers led by the University of Manchester developed a new antiviral using natural glucose derivatives called cyclodextrins – a type of sugar – which shows promise in treating a broad range of viruses including herpes simplex, respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis C, HIV and Zika virus.

The Fitbit on your wrist not only counts your steps and minutes of sleep, it can also help tell if you are coming down with the flu – and warn health authorities to get ready to help.

Japan’s Shionogi and Swiss drugmaker Roche won U.S. FDA approval for Xofluza, the first new flu drug approved by the regulatory agency in nearly 20 years.

Roche’s hopes of recapturing lost ground in the generics-flooded influenza market got a boost after a late-stage study showed the Swiss drugmaker’s new medicine reduced symptoms in people at high risk of complications.

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai evaluated data on the brains of 622 people who had indications of Alzheimer’s and 322 people who did not. They found levels of herpes virus in the Alzheimer’s patients that were up to twice as high as the non-disease group.

J&J said its experimental flu drug significantly reduced the presence of the virus in patients with a type of influenza in a mid-stage study.

Scientists still don’t know if two commonly-used flu drugs – Roche’s Tamiflu and GlaxoSmithKline’s Relenza – really work in seasonal or pandemic flu outbreaks and say robust clinical trials are urgently needed to find out. While such medicines are stockpiled by governments around the world and were widely used in the 2009/2010 H1N1 “swine flu” […]