Treatments for peanut allergy and Parkinson’s disease are among U.S. drug launches that have been postponed by the COVID-19 pandemic as drugmakers struggle with disruptions to business, a Reuters review of filings and interviews with executives show.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave the green light to Sanofi’s Sarclisa (isatuximab-irfc) in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone (pom-dex) for adults with multiple myeloma who have had two previous therapies including lenalidomide and a protease inhibitor.

GlaxoSmithKline CEO Emma Walmsley is anticipating a good 2020 for her company, with the potential of six regulatory approvals in the United States.

Forty-eight new molecular entities and new therapeutic biological products were approved by the U.S. regulatory agency’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) in 2019.

Barring a last-minute reversal, 2018 will likely end as a down year for the biotech industry, at least in terms of stock performance.

An $11 billion (8.12 billion pounds) burst of biotech bids in just four days has fueled expectations of a 2018 surge in life science deals as large drugmakers shop for promising assets from smaller rivals.

U.S. drug approvals hit a 21-year high in 2017, with 46 novel medicines winning a green light — more than double the previous year — while the figure also rose in the EU.

2017 has shaped up to be a bumper year for drug approvals, with U.S. officials clearing twice as many novel medicines as in 2016, yet returns on research investment at leading pharmaceutical companies are down.

Eli Lilly and Company today announced its 2018 financial guidance, including low-single-digit revenue growth driven by volume from recently launched pharmaceutical products. The company also highlighted key events for 2018, including continued progress on Lilly’s pipeline.