Johnson & Johnson will stop selling talc Baby Powder in the United States and Canada, saying demand had fallen in the wake of what the company called “misinformation” about the product’s safety amid a barrage of legal challenges.

Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a New Jersey state jury to pay punitive damages of $750 million to four plaintiffs who allege that the company’s Baby Powder caused their cancer, a ruling that will be reduced to around $185 million because of state laws, according to a lawyer for the plaintiffs and J&J.

For the first time in nearly 50 years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will examine asbestos testing for talc powders and cosmetics at a hearing.

Johnson & Johnson Chief Executive Alex Gorsky told a jury Monday that he did not read all the internal company documents related to potential asbestos contamination in Johnson’s Baby Powder.

An expert panel formed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration endorsed asbestos testing standards for cosmetics that reject long-held industry positions and reflect those of public health authorities and experts for thousands of plaintiffs who allege contaminated talc products caused their cancers.

Johnson & Johnson said recent tests showed that Johnson’s Baby Powder was free of asbestos, after FDA investigations reported trace amounts of the material in the product earlier in 2019.

Johnson & Johnson said recent tests showed that Johnson’s Baby Powder was free of asbestos, after FDA investigations reported trace amounts of the material in the product earlier in 2019.

Over the past 50 years, the FDA has relied upon – and often deferred to – industry even as outside experts and consumers repeatedly raised serious health concerns about talc powders and cosmetics, a Reuters investigation found.

Johnson & Johnson said 15 new tests found no asbestos in a bottle of baby powder that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says tested positive for trace amounts of asbestos, a finding the agency stands by.

Four major U.S. retailers, including Walmart and Target Corp., removed all 22-ounce bottles of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder from their stores following the healthcare conglomerate’s recall last week of some bottles due to possible asbestos contamination.