Roche aims to defend the company’s multiple sclerosis (MS) franchise from rivals Novartis and Sanofi with new studies of the Swiss drugmaker’s $4 billion-per-year Ocrevus product and advanced trials of the experimental medicine fenebrutinib.

Roche company Genentech has released data from a long-term clinical trial of Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) in multiple sclerosis. The U.S. FDA and the European Medicines Agency accepted Novartis’ marketing applications for siponimod (BAF312) to treat secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis in adults.

Roche faces a fresh row over drug pricing in Britain, following a decision by the body responsible for medicine use within the state health service not to approve the company’s drug Ocrevus for treating a highly disabling form of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Active Biotech regained the global development and commercialization rights to the neurodegenerative disease drug laquinimod from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries.

Among the industry group PhRMA’s findings was that overall R&D spending was at an all-time high in 2017, hitting $71.4 billion, up from $65.5 billion in 2016 and from $29.8 billion in 2001.

Santhera Pharmaceuticals said a study of the Swiss drug company’s medicine Raxone in primary progressive multiple sclerosis showed no difference between the treatment and placebo groups in disease progression.

The European Union approved Roche’s multiple sclerosis medicine Ocrevus, one of the Swiss company’s key new drugs.

Swiss drugmaker Roche won a key European panel’s recommendation for its multiple sclerosis drug Ocrevus.

Roche’s multiple sclerosis drug Ocrevus won U.S. approval, putting the potential blockbuster back on track after a brief delay.

Roche said its Ocrevus multiple sclerosis drug controlled the most common form of the disease better than a rival’s medicine and worked against another form of MS for which there is no approved treatment.