The Accelerated Approval Integrity Act of 2022 (H.R. 6963) aims to remove loopholes in the Food and Drug Administration’s accelerated approval pathway. The bill, however, fails to adequately consider the whole picture, and may inadvertently remove medications that simply can’t complete confirmatory trials within the narrow timeframe allowed.

The high cost of insulin to treat diabetes would be drastically reduced under legislation the U.S. House of Representatives passed on March 31, in a rare example of drug price reform gaining traction in Congress.

Since the release of the Democratic Party’s $3.5 trillion budget draft in early August, intraparty tensions have been high as debate roils over what to cut and how to trim it so that the price tag becomes more amenable. On November 3, after almost three months of discussion, one hurdle of contention seems to have been cleared: the Democrats have reached an agreement about how to lower the price of some prescription drugs.

Democratic Party lawmakers holding up proposed drug pricing reforms are among the largest beneficiaries of the pharmaceutical industry’s push to stave off price cuts, a Reuters analysis of public lobbying and campaign data shows.

The U.S. House Judiciary Committee voted on Sept. 29 to approve three bills to stop practices drugmakers use to raise prices and fend off competition, including a bill to ban the tactic of paying generic companies to delay bringing cheaper versions of their medicines to market.

U.S. lawmakers from both parties and both houses of Congress introduced eight antitrust bills aimed at tackling the problem of high and rising drug prices, including bills to stop brand name drug companies from paying generic firms to stay off the market.

Republican and Democratic U.S. senators called for a government analysis of foreign influence in the U.S. pharmaceutical supply chain, saying the coronavirus pandemic has exposed an over-reliance on China and other countries for the production of essential drugs.

A bill to encourage the manufacture of active pharmaceutical ingredients in America was introduced in the U.S. Senate by Senators Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) and Bob Menendez (R-NJ).

U.S. President Donald Trump signed a bill allocating $8.3 billion to bolster the country’s capacity to test for the new coronavirus and fund other measures to stem an outbreak that has infected some 100,000 people worldwide.

The U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved an $8.3 billion bill to combat the spread of the new coronavirus and develop vaccines for the highly contagious disease, sending it to the Senate for final passage.