The Trump administration secured commitments from top pharmaceutical companies to work together to develop a vaccine and treatments to fight the coronavirus.

As the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference entered the final day for 2020, a few topics rose to the top as trending, including the relative lack of big deals.

Leading scientists, public policy experts and biotech industry leaders joined forces to launch “Working to Fight AMR,” a coalition working to raise public awareness of the growing threat posed by antimicrobial resistance.

As concerns over the price of prescription medicine continue to make headlines as the country barrels toward another election, a new study from the Scripps Research bolsters an argument touted by the pharmaceutical industry over the rebate system.

After negative reports about after-hours parties that have been deemed disrespectful toward women and multiple reports about the lack of gender diversity on industry boards of directors, biotech’s largest trade association is taking action.

President Donald Trump nominated former pharmaceutical executive Alex Azar to serve as U.S. Health and Human Services secretary, saying Azar would push to lower the price of medicines.

Hours before the U.S. Senate recessed for the remainder of summer 2017, legislators approved key legislation that will provide the necessary funding to keep the U.S. FDA operating efficiently.

Although virtually no one in the urban bubble where biopharmaceutical companies reside expected it to happen, Donald Trump won. So, now what?

The two leading biopharmaceutical organizations made a bold public statement on FDA off-label policy that proposes new regulatory standard that provides a great starting point for the inevitable policy debates on how the FDA defines “false and misleading” in marketing.

The Biotechnology Industry Organization released a report titled: Emerging Therapeutic Company Investment and Deal Trends. BIO Industry Analysis says more than 90 percent of the biopharma industry is composed of small, emerging companies. According to BIO President Jim Greenwood and E. Cartier Esham, Ph.D., executive VP of BIO’s Emerging Companies Section, it is important for the trade association to better understand early-stage investor and deal-making trends in order to determine where scientific or policy issues may be affecting the ability to maintain a robust pipeline of innovative medicines.