In a countersuit, Cambridge, Mass.-based bluebird bio is hitting back at Roche-owned Spark Therapeutics over the use of the word “spark” in promotional campaigns involving the company’s “Be the Spark” campaign against sickle cell disease.

In a flurry of activity, multiple biopharma companies made their first appearance on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange on June 25, raising hundreds of millions of dollars to advance the development of next-generation therapeutics and scale their businesses.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Chiesi Global Rare Diseases’ Ferriprox (deferiprone) for the treatment of transfusional iron overload caused by sickle cell disease or other anemias in adults and children ages 3 years and older.

Vertex Pharmaceuticals expanded the company’s collaborative partnership with CRISPR Therapeutics to develop and commercialize a possible cure for sickle cell disease (SCD) and transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia (TDT). The focus is on the development of CTX001, an autologous, ex vivo CRISPR-CAS9 gene-edited therapy.

Shares of bluebird bio climbed in trading after the company announced on March 10 that analyses demonstrate the lentiviral vector BB305 was unlikely to be the cause of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reported in an early-stage clinical study of LentiGlobin for sickle cell disease.

Bluebird bio placed the company’s Phase I/II and Phase III trials of LentiGlobin gene therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD) on temporary suspension.

At the 2021 virtual JP Morgan Healthcare Conference, Vertex Pharmaceuticals’ chief executive officer Reshma Kewalramani said the company is looking to buy “mid- and late-stage assets.”

The American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition began December 5 with numerous presentations, abstracts and posters.

Shares of bluebird bio fell in trading after the company announced that the sickle cell disease gene therapy treatment bb1111 will not be submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for two more years.

The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency adopted a positive opinion recommending conditional marketing authorization of Novartis’ Adakveo (crizanlizumab) for the prevention of recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, or pain crises, in patients with sickle cell disease aged 16 years and older.