The European Union is waiting to see if British lawmakers block Brexit before giving Britain concessions to strike a new withdrawal agreement, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

Novo Nordisk reported solid growth for the company’s new diabetes drug and will submit a tablet version – a key growth hope – for U.S. approval in first-quarter 2019, lifting the Danish drugmaker’s shares.

As the United Kingdom nears closer to exiting the European Union without a deal, drug manufacturers such as Novartis are preparing contingencies for how they will continue to provide medications – many of them life-saving – for patients in the U.K.

A new report indicates that the so-called “Brexit” will have a negative impact on healthcare in the United Kingdom.

The top pharmaceutical companies are trying to proactively tackle, through shifts in R&D strategy and other tactics, the healthcare demands of the future.

AstraZeneca will keep the company’s freeze on manufacturing investments in Britain if the country’s exit from the European Union fails to give enough clarity on future trading relations, the drugmaker’s chairman was quoted as saying.

The number of new clinical trials started in Britain during 2017 was 25 percent lower than the average for 2009-2016, as anxiety about Brexit’s impact on future medicines regulation made companies hesitate about running studies in the country.

The European Medicines Agency is to scale back operations further as it copes with higher than expected staff losses, triggered by the watchdog’s forced relocation from London to Amsterdam because of Brexit.

Sanofi and Novartis said on Wednesday they planned to increase stockpiles of medicines Britain in preparation for potential disruption if the UK crashes out of the European Union without a deal.

Drug regulators across Europe are hiring extra staff and increasing their workload as the role of British experts in the EU-wide system of medicines supervision winds down ahead of Brexit.