Johnson & Johnson was ordered by a New Jersey state jury to pay punitive damages of $750 million to four plaintiffs who allege that the company’s Baby Powder caused their cancer, a ruling that will be reduced to around $185 million because of state laws, according to a lawyer for the plaintiffs and J&J.

A federal judge tossed out whistleblower lawsuits alleging that pharmaceutical giants Eli Lilly and Bayer used nurses to illegally boost sales of various prescription drugs in a kickback scheme.

Novartis AG laid the blame for the manipulation of data behind the company’s $2.1 million gene therapy Zolgensma at the feet of the former executives Brian and Allan Kaspar.

Reckitt Benckiser Group agreed to pay $1.4 billion to settle a U.S. investigation into the sales and marketing of Suboxone Film, a product managed by the spinout company Indivior.

Bayer shares fell by as much as 5 percent after a California couple were awarded more than $2 billion in the largest U.S. jury penalty over allegations the company’s Roundup weed killer causes cancer.

U.S. states filed a lawsuit accusing Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc. of orchestrating a sweeping scheme with 19 other drug companies to inflate drug prices – sometimes by more than 1,000 percent – and stifle competition for generic drugs, state prosecutors said.

A Missouri Supreme Court ruling on talc lawsuits could reduce the liability and number of large trials Johnson & Johnson faces over allegations the company’s talc products, including baby powder, cause cancer.

Swiss pharma giant Novartis has found itself at the center of a legal battle that could determine if the company engaged in a research project that was a kickback in disguise.

A unit of Johnson & Johnson will pay $360 million to resolve an investigation into the company’s financial support of a charity that helped Medicare patients cover out-of-pocket drug costs.

U.S. biotechnology company Clovis Oncology Inc., Chief Executive Patrick Mahaffy, and former CFO Erle Mast will pay more than $20 million to settle charges of misleading investors about the efficacy of a cancer drug, the top U.S. securities regulator said.