Advanced Care Scripts Inc. will pay $3.5 million to resolve allegations that the Florida-based specialty pharmacy served as a conduit for a Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. subsidiary to pay kickbacks to Medicare patients, the U.S. Justice Department said.

Novartis AG agreed to pay more than $729 million to settle U.S. government charges that the company paid illegal kickbacks to doctors and patients to boost drug sales, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

Insys founder John Kapoor is using the coronavirus pandemic as part of his legal defense to remain out of prison while he appeals his January 2020 racketeering conviction for kickback schemes to boost prescriptions of his company’s powerful opioid Subsys.

John Kapoor, the founder and former chief executive officer of Insys Therapeutics, was sentenced to more than five years in federal prison for the role his company played in the opioid epidemic.

Federal authorities charged 10 former National Football League players for allegedly defrauding a healthcare program of more than $3.4 million by filing false claims for expensive medical equipment.

The owner of a telemarketing company implicated in the largest component of a $1.2 billion Medicare fraud involving the supply of medically unnecessary orthotic braces pleaded guilty to criminal charges, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

Days after agreeing to pay nearly $225 million in additional fines to the U.S. government for fraudulent marketing schemes to boost sales of the opioid Subsys, Insys Therapeutics filed for bankruptcy.

Insys Therapeutics Inc. agreed to pay $225 million and an operating unit will plead guilty to fraud to settle probes into their payment of kickbacks to induce doctors to prescribe highly addictive opioids, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

Mallinckrodt Plc tentatively agreed to pay $15.4 million to resolve a U.S. Justice Department probe into how a drugmaker that the company now owns marketed an expensive treatment for a rare infant seizure disorder and multiple sclerosis.

Astellas and Amgen will pay nearly $125 million to resolve claims they used charities that help cover Medicare patients’ out-of-pocket drug costs as a way to pay kickbacks aimed at encouraging the use of their high-priced medications.