Top U.S. infectious disease official Anthony Fauci on Feb. 23 told CNN that he expects the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to soon relax some Covid-19 recommendations aimed at curbing its spread for people who have been vaccinated.

Reuters found new evidence that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) response to the pandemic was marred by actions – or inaction – by the agency’s career scientists and frontline staff.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention administered 4,563,260 first doses of Covid-19 vaccines in the United States as of the morning of Jan. 4 and distributed 15,418,500 doses.

Millions of Covid-19 vaccines were sitting unused in U.S. hospitals and elsewhere a week into the massive inoculation campaign, putting the government’s target for 20 million vaccinations during December in doubt.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted to recommend the use of Moderna Inc.’s Covid-19 vaccine on people 18 years of age and older.

A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel on Dec. 12 recommended the nation’s first COVID-19 vaccine, helping clear the way for public health authorities to begin the largest vaccination campaign in U.S. history.

A mounting U.S. death toll has tempered enthusiasm about a coming Covid-19 vaccine with 9/11-like fatalities projected every day for the months ahead, even with a rapid rollout of inoculations, which could start as soon as Dec. 14.

Companies and industry groups lobbying to get their U.S. workers to the front of the line for COVID vaccination are running into a patchwork of state plans and confusion over who is essential, and who is not.

With all the expectations for available Covid-19 vaccines based on the successful late-stage trial results reported by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna, the looming question is: when will the public be able to start getting the vaccines?

North Dakota became the 35th U.S. state to require face coverings be worn in public, as governors across the country grapple with a surge in coronavirus infections that threatens to swamp their healthcare systems.