Across the pharmaceutical industry, forging collaborations are a key tool to bringing new medications through the clinic and to market. This week, multiple companies have partnered in attempts to bring forth new therapies. BioSpace took a look at some of these announcements.

Shares of Cellectis Therapeutics were up in trading after the gene-editing pioneer company forged a deal with Cambridge, Mass.-based Cytovia Therapeutics to develop immunotherapies based on gene-edited allogeneic CAR T-cells.

Neoleukin was benched by the FDA with a clinical hold for the biopharma company’s lead cancer immunotherapy candidate.  

Backed by Leaps by Bayer, Bay Area-based Senti Biosciences secured $105 million in a Series B financing round that will help the company advance its therapeutic pipeline of allogeneic chimeric antigen receptor natural killer (CAR-NK) cell therapies.

Kiadis Pharma licensed a previously undisclosed K-NK0004 program to Sanofi covering Kiadis’ proprietary CD38 knock out (CD38KO) K-NK therapeutics for combination with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies.

Gilead Sciences, Kite, and oNKo-innate announced that the companies entered into a three-year cancer immunotherapy research collaboration to support the discovery and development of next-generation drug and engineered cell therapies focused on natural killer (NK) cells.

As pharma companies bolster their pipelines via multibillion-dollar acquisitions, drug manufacturers continue to heavily invest in the oncology space.

The immuno-oncology therapy CAR-T utilizes specific types of immune cells, T-cells, which are drawn from the cancer patient, supercharged and infused back into the patient. Now, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed a slightly different approach using a different type of immune cell called Natural Killer (NK) cells.

Dragonfly Therapeutics and AbbVie forged a multi-target research collaboration to advance new treatment options for autoimmune and oncology indications.

Netherlands-based Kiadis Pharma is discontinuing Phase III development of lead T-cell asset ATIR101 and laying off half of the company’s staff, seven months after acquiring CytoSen.