The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a report that reviewed dozens of studies and the CDC’s own unpublished data on Covid-19 study concluding that immunity caused by natural Covid-19 infection and vaccines both lasted at least six months, but the immunity provided by the vaccines was more consistent.

Booster shots to bolster immunity against the coronavirus would be free and accessible, U.S. President Joe Biden said on Friday, one day after federal health agencies backed a booster rollout.

External advisors to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will meet on Sept. 17 to consider data from Pfizer and BioNTech in support of booster shots. Meanwhile, a timeline is being presented on the authorization of Covid-19 vaccines for children.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration scientists said on Sept. 15 that booster doses of Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine may not be needed, even though the third shot generates a higher immune response in recipients.

Additional Covid-19 vaccine booster shots are not needed for the general population, leading scientists including two departing senior U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials and several from the World Health Organization (WHO) said in an article published in a medical journal on Sept. 13.

Heading into fall, with the Covid-19 pandemic surging again and researchers tracking new variants, there is plenty of news. BioSpace takes a look, including several research studies suggesting that some people have unusually strong immunity against Covid-19.

An advisory panel to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Aug. 30 unanimously recommended the Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE Covid-19 vaccine for people age 16 and older, an important step that could help accelerate vaccine mandates in the United States.

More studies into vaccinated populations show that although antibody responses drop months after vaccination against Covid-19, they still dramatically protect against severe disease and hospitalization. Studies are also continuing on the value and efficacy of booster shots, particularly against the Delta variant.

The Covid-19 vaccines available in the United States are still highly effective at preventing hospitalization but their effectiveness against new infections has decreased as the Delta variant spread, according to new studies published on Aug. 18 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. A different study suggests children’s noses may be better than adults’ at defending against infection because of “pre-activated” immunity against the coronavirus.

Moderna Inc. said on May 5 early human trial data shows that a third dose of either the company’s current Covid-19 shot or an experimental new vaccine candidate increases immunity against variants of Covid-19 first found in Brazil and South Africa.