Sinovac’s Covid-19 vaccine is highly effective against serious illness, although rival shots from Pfizer/BioNTech and AstraZeneca showed better protection rates, a large real world study from Malaysia showed.

Several Asian nations are quickly ramping up vaccination campaigns from shaky starts to combat growing Covid-19 infections, as supply shipments roll in and people overcome hesitancy in hopes of easing curbs and freeing up travel.

With a new wave of Covid-19 infections fueled by the Delta variant striking countries worldwide, disease experts are scrambling to learn whether the latest version of coronavirus is making people – mainly the unvaccinated – sicker than before.

The Olympics host city Tokyo, as well as Thailand and Malaysia, announced record Covid-19 infections on July 31, mostly driven by the highly transmissible Delta variant of the disease.

The highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus is surging through Asia, with record numbers of infections in Australia and South Korea, prompting some countries to tighten curbs and others to hasten vaccination.

The White House laid out a plan to share 55 million U.S. Covid-19 vaccine doses globally, with roughly 75 percent of the doses allocated to Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and Africa through the COVAX international vaccine-sharing program.

The first human case of a new strain of avian flu was diagnosed in China in late May. Chinese health authorities say there is a low risk of contagion. After China notoriously underreported COVID-19 mortality, can this new assurance be trusted?

Two Covid-19 vaccines from China’s Sinopharm showed more than 70 percent efficacy against symptomatic cases, but it remains unclear how much protection they provide against severe or asymptomatic cases, according to the first detailed result of a large late-stage study published to the public.

The help wanted signs are up across the biopharma industry. According to BioSpace, companies are opening and expanding facilities, which is good news for job seekers.

Building on the success of the company’s mRNA research, BioNTech will establish its first regional hub in the Asia Pacific region. The company will open a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility to support a global supply of mRNA-based vaccines and therapeutics in Singapore.