Mayor Bill de Blasio’s chief medical adviser on Feb. 25 downplayed the results of two studies suggesting that a new coronavirus variant found in New York City in November will be more resistant to vaccines now being administered.

Feb. 5 was a different sort of Opening Day at Yankee Stadium, the legendary home of baseball’s “Bronx Bombers,” as New York ramped up its drive to vaccinate the state’s most vulnerable residents, many who live in the hard-hit Bronx neighborhoods that surround the legendary sports venue.

More than 10 million Americans had received their first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine as of Jan. 13, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as the year-old pandemic roared on unchecked.

Nearly 9 million Americans had been given their first Covid-19 vaccination dose as of Jan. 11, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, as states scrambled to step up inoculations that have yet to slow the roaring pandemic.

In New York, like in much of the United States, efforts to get the two vaccines that have so far been authorized into the arms of Americans have moved slower than hoped due to a slew of issues.

New York City aims to vaccinate 1 million residents against the coronavirus by the end of January 2021, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

New York City’s public schools will begin to reopen for in-person learning on Dec. 7, starting with elementary schools for students whose parents agree to weekly tests for the novel coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced.

The U.S. death toll from Covid-19 surpassed a grim new milestone of 250,000 lives lost as New York City’s public school system – the nation’s largest – called a halt to in-classroom instruction, citing a jump in coronavirus infection rates.