New York state filed civil charges accusing Johnson & Johnson of insurance fraud for downplaying the risks of opioid painkillers, including to doctors and elderly patients.

The number of new cases of the novel coronavirus reported in the United States fell 15 percent last week from the previous seven days, and deaths fell for a fourth week in a row, according to a Reuters analysis.

The medical cannabis market in the United States, even with all of its restrictions, continues to be a fertile area not only for dispensaries, but pharma companies developing cannabis-derived drugs; and proponents say further growth can be generated by educating physicians about medical cannabis.

The U.S. coronavirus outbreak crossed a grim milestone of over 3 million confirmed cases as more states reported record numbers of new infections, and Florida faced an impending shortage of intensive care unit hospital beds.

Another wave of states prepared to ease coronavirus restrictions on U.S. commerce this week, despite health experts warning there is still too little diagnostic testing, while the White House forecast a staggering jump in the nation’s monthly jobless rate.

An Oklahoma judge said Johnson & Johnson must pay that state $465 million for fueling the opioid epidemic through the deceptive marketing of painkillers, down from his original award of $572 million.

Monthly premiums for an average 2020 Obamacare health insurance plan will fall about 4 percent from 2019, according to a report released by the Trump administration.

An Oklahoma judge ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $572.1 million to the state for the company’s part in fueling an opioid epidemic by deceptively marketing addictive painkillers, a sum substantially less than investors expected, driving up J&J shares.

Teva Pharmaceutical agreed to pay an $85 million settlement with the state of Oklahoma days before the company was set to face trial over allegations that the world’s largest generic manufacturer and other drugmakers helped fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic.