The United States secured almost a third of the first one billion doses planned for AstraZeneca’s experimental COVID-19 vaccine by pledging up to $1.2 billion, as world powers scramble for medicines to get their economies back to work.

President Donald Trump’s administration awarded a contract worth up to $812 million for a new U.S. company to manufacture drugs and drug ingredients to fight COVID-19 on American soil, aiming to end dependence on other countries.

The U.S. government plans to stockpile hundreds of millions of doses of vaccines that are under development to combat the novel coronavirus with the goal of having one or more vaccines ready to deploy by the end of the year, the health secretary said.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of health insurers seeking $12 billion from the federal government under a program set up by the Obamacare law aimed at encouraging them to offer medical coverage to previously uninsured Americans.

This extraordinary March and April – marked by rising numbers of Covid-19 cases and fatalities, suffering for patients and families, courageous efforts by clinicians, restricted social interaction, business closings, massive unemployment – has battered our healthcare system and economy. Here are a few early thoughts on how the evolving pandemic has changed the outlook for health policy after the November elections.

Data analytics group GlobalData released a report that showed the global health care sector has been subjected to an array of cyberattacks as the industry deals with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Moderna Inc. announced an agreement for a commitment of up to $483 million from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) to accelerate development of the company’s mRNA vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, against the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2).

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is investigating a manufacturing defect in some initial coronavirus test kits that prompted some states to seek emergency approval to use their own test kits.

Those pesky ones and zeros lurked behind virtually every key trend in pharma marketing in 2019, and their influence will only grow in 2020.

As pharma companies bolster their pipelines via multibillion-dollar acquisitions, drug manufacturers continue to heavily invest in the oncology space.