Americans were back on the road after more than two months of coronavirus lockdowns that kept them homebound, with beach-area traffic tripling since the low point in mid-April.

Favipiravir, a candidate drug for treating the new coronavirus, has produced promising results in early clinical trials in Russia, according to the Russian Direct Investment Fund.

Gilead Sciences entered into licensing agreements with five generic drugmakers to make the antiviral drug Veklury (remdesivir), the first medicine shown to be effective against COVID-19, available in 127 countries.

British researchers will study the genes of thousands of ill COVID-19 patients to try to crack one of the most puzzling riddles of the novel coronavirus: why does it kill some people but give others not even a mild headache?

As a number of states begin to lift stay-at-home orders, questions remain around strategies to curb the continued spread of COVID-19. Public health officials are ramping up efforts to monitor and contain new cases through contact tracing, a disease control method used to identify and notify individuals who have been exposed to the virus. The strategy is a key component of other nations’ efforts to safely ease social distancing measures. During this webinar, panelists will discuss cases studies from abroad and best practices as policymakers look to implement a contact tracing strategy in the United States.

The World Health Organization said some treatments appear to be limiting the severity or length of the COVID-19 disease and that WHO was focusing on learning more about four or five of the most promising ones.

iSpecimen will supply the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with serum samples from subjects who have previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

U.S. coronavirus deaths topped 80,000, according to a Reuters tally, as nearly all states have taken steps to relax lockdown measures.

A brief roundup of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Pregnant women are no more likely to become severely ill with COVID-19 than other women, according to a preliminary study in Britain, but most expectant mothers who do develop serious illness tend to be in the later stages of pregnancy.