Johnson & Johnson will contribute up to $1 billion more to a potential settlement of lawsuits alleging the New Brunswick, New Jersey-based drugmaker and other companies fueled the U.S. opioid epidemic, bringing J&J’s total payment to $5 billion.

A federal appeals court overturned a judge’s approval of a novel plan by lawyers representing cities and counties suing drug companies over the U.S. opioid crisis that would bring every community nationally into their settlement talks.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) asked state public health officials to prepare to distribute a potential coronavirus vaccine to high-risk groups as soon as late October, documents published by the agency showed.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) said McKesson Corp. will be the central distributor for future coronavirus vaccines, sending the U.S. drug distributor’s shares up more than 3%.

A highly anticipated trial pitting New York state against McKesson Corp., Johnson & Johnson, CVS Health Corp. and others for allegedly fueling the opioid epidemic was postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak, according to the court.

Twenty one states rejected an $18 billion settlement proposal from three major U.S. drug distributors to resolve lawsuits over their alleged role in the opioid crisis, although settlement discussions continue, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

Federal prosecutors are investigating six pharmaceutical companies for potential criminal charges in connection with shipping large quantities of opioid painkillers that contributed to a healthcare crisis, according to regulatory filings.

New York’s insurance regulator formally notified a group of opioid manufacturers and distributors that the NYDFS will launch a civil enforcement action against them for contributing towards a rise in health insurance premiums in the state, said two sources familiar with the matter.

Four large drug companies reached a last-minute $260 million legal settlement over their role in the U.S. opioid addiction epidemic, averting the first federal trial that was scheduled to start in Cleveland.

A federal appeals court rejected a bid by eight drug retailers and distributors to disqualify the judge overseeing nationwide opioid litigation after they claimed his rulings, public statements and efforts to encourage settlements created an appearance of bias.