Twenty one states rejected an $18 billion settlement proposal from three major U.S. drug distributors to resolve lawsuits over their alleged role in the opioid crisis, although settlement discussions continue, according to two sources familiar with the matter.

Federal prosecutors are investigating six pharmaceutical companies for potential criminal charges in connection with shipping large quantities of opioid painkillers that contributed to a healthcare crisis, according to regulatory filings.

New York’s insurance regulator formally notified a group of opioid manufacturers and distributors that the NYDFS will launch a civil enforcement action against them for contributing towards a rise in health insurance premiums in the state, said two sources familiar with the matter.

Four large drug companies reached a last-minute $260 million legal settlement over their role in the U.S. opioid addiction epidemic, averting the first federal trial that was scheduled to start in Cleveland.

A federal appeals court rejected a bid by eight drug retailers and distributors to disqualify the judge overseeing nationwide opioid litigation after they claimed his rulings, public statements and efforts to encourage settlements created an appearance of bias.

Johnson & Johnson will pay $20.4 million to settle claims by two Ohio counties, allowing the U.S. healthcare giant to avoid an upcoming federal trial seeking to hold the industry responsible for the nation’s opioid epidemic.

Eight drug companies urged a federal appeals court to disqualify the judge overseeing nationwide opioid litigation, in a last-ditch effort to avoid having him preside over a landmark trial.

Five U.S. states filed lawsuits accusing Purdue Pharma LP of illegally marketing and selling opioids, including OxyContin.

Kentucky’s attorney general sued Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc., accusing the company of playing a role in propagating an opioid epidemic in the state.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration chief Scott Gottlieb criticized pharmacy benefit managers, health insurers and drugmakers for “Kabuki drug-pricing constructs” that profit the industry at the expense of consumers.