For all the digital and interactive tools that keep popping up, television remains the DTC marketer’s old reliable.

In addition to increased scrutiny on appropriate tone and message in light of social distancing and stay-at-home mandates, tactically, we’re already seeing the impact with brands like Linzess reinforcing telemedicine opportunities by shifting their tagline to “You may be able to talk to your doctor about your symptoms online.”

While pharma brands have made great strides in engaging with people on social media, Shuttlerock CEO Jonny Hendriksen has found that several myths have been perpetuated about translating existing video into shorter, mobile ads.

U.S. drugmakers filed a lawsuit challenging a new government regulation that would require them to disclose the list price of prescription drugs in direct-to-consumer television advertisements.

HHS announced its new price transparency rules for direct-to-consumer TV ads. Now the industry has to sort out what to do about them.

Thanks to a finalized rule requiring price disclosure in DTC advertisements (this is assuming that successful legal challenges do not emerge), what will the impact be and how can the requirement be accommodated while minimizing any confusion that may result?

The Trump administration will require drugmakers to disclose the list price of prescription drugs in DTC TV advertisements, part of the government’s efforts to lower costs for U.S. consumers.

Johnson & Johnson will start adding the price of the company’s medicines to television commercials by March 2019, becoming the first drugmaker to heed a call by U.S. President Donald Trump.