Johnson & Johnson will pay $20.4 million to settle claims by two Ohio counties, allowing the U.S. healthcare giant to avoid an upcoming federal trial seeking to hold the industry responsible for the nation’s opioid epidemic.

An Oklahoma judge ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $572.1 million to the state for the company’s part in fueling an opioid epidemic by deceptively marketing addictive painkillers, a sum substantially less than investors expected, driving up J&J shares.

Lawmakers on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee urged the Trump administration to conduct a scientific review of a Justice Department-backed bill to classify all illicit chemical knockoffs of the potent painkiller fentanyl in the same legal category as heroin.

Teva Pharmaceutical agreed to pay an $85 million settlement with the state of Oklahoma days before the company was set to face trial over allegations that the world’s largest generic manufacturer and other drugmakers helped fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic.

Five U.S. states filed lawsuits accusing Purdue Pharma LP of illegally marketing and selling opioids, including OxyContin.

Opioid use has reached crisis proportions not only in the United States but also in Canada and some European countries, as prescription opioid painkillers have become much more common, the OECD club of wealthy nations said.

The founder of Insys Therapeutics Inc. became the highest-ranking pharmaceutical executive to be convicted in a case tied to the U.S. opioid crisis, when he and four colleagues were found guilty of participating in a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe an addictive painkiller.

Drug distributor McKesson Corp. agreed to pay $37 million to resolve a lawsuit by the state of West Virginia seeking to hold the company responsible for contributing to the opioid epidemic, the state’s attorney general said.

U.S. President Donald Trump touted progress in the fight against opioid abuse and promised to hold drugmakers accountable for their part in the crisis, a day after his administration brought its first related criminal charges against a major drug distributor and company executives.

Purdue Pharma LP fraudulently transferred funds to members of the wealthy Sackler family who control the OxyContin maker despite knowing the company faced major liabilities that had made it already insolvent, New York’s attorney general alleged.