As COVID-19 continues to expand across the globe, more pharmaceutical companies are hitting the brakes on clinical trials as part of an effort to ease the burden on doctors and facilities needed to treat patients combating the disease.

Spring Bank Pharmaceuticals, based in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, is discontinuing development of inarigivir soproxil for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV).

According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), there are 264 vaccines in development to prevent and treat diseases.

Cambridge, Mass.-based Dicerna Pharmaceuticals signed a research collaboration and licensing deal with Switzerland’s Roche for chronic hepatitis B virus therapies that could hit $1.67 billion.

GlaxoSmithKline exercised an option to license Ionis Pharmaceuticals’ antisense medicines for people with chronic hepatitis B virus infection following positive Phase 2 results.

A collaboration and license deal was inked with Gilead Sciences Inc. to develop and market a long-acting injectable HIV therapy using Durect Corp.’s SABER technology.

VBI Vaccines Inc. said a late-stage study testing the company’s hepatitis B vaccine against GlaxoSmithKline’s Engerix-B met the main goals.

Gilead Sciences Inc. is acquiring the global rights to develop and commercialize novel small molecules against two targets from South Korea-based Yuhan Corporation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Sanofi’s new pediatric vaccine immunizing children against six diseases.

J&J agreed to develop and market Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Inc.’s gene-silencing hepatitis B treatment and buy a minor stake in a deal that could be potentially worth more than $3.7 billion.