The Zika virus can infect and alter cells in the human nervous system that are crucial for formation of bones and cartilage in the skull, a study found.

Japanese drugmaker Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. said it is developing a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which has been linked to severe birth defects, and has secured funding from a U.S. government agency.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued emergency authorization for a Zika diagnostics test from Swiss drugmaker Roche, skirting normal approval channels as the regulator moves to fight the disease’s spread.

A report shows the kind of damage Zika infections can do to the developing brain – damage that goes well beyond that caused by the devastating birth defect microcephaly.

The HHS has shifted $81 million in funds from other projects to continue work on developing vaccines to fight Zika in the absence of any funding from U.S. lawmakers.

U.S. government researchers said they have begun their first clinical trial of a Zika vaccine while the Obama administration told lawmakers funds to fight the virus would run out in the coming weeks.

Genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes could be let loose in Florida’s battle against the Zika virus if regulators approve them, according to British firm Oxitec.

International Business Machines Corp. said it would provide its technology and resources to help track the spread of the Zika virus.

French biotech firm Valneva said it has produced a possible vaccine against the mosquito-borne Zika virus.

The U.S. National Institutes of Health will fund a study to monitor U.S. athletes, coaches and members of the Olympic Committee staff for exposure to Zika virus.