Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk will offer cheaper insulin to U.S. diabetics in response to criticism over the high price of the medication and after similar moves by rivals Sanofi and Eli Lilly.

A Chicago-based arbitration panel ruled in favor of Eli Lilly and Company in a claim filed by Adocia S.A. over the companies’ prior collaboration on a rapid-acting insulin.

Novo Nordisk will fight a lawsuit filed in a Danish court that alleges the pharmaceutical manufacturer made misleading statements about the company’s insulin business in the United States.

Novo Nordisk’s sales forecast for 2019 was raised due to growing demand for obesity products and a new injectable treatment for diabetes, which is now the company’s growth engine as insulin sales decline.

Sanofi reported overall net sales increased by 5.5 percent for second-quarter 2019, driven by Sanofi Genzyme, Sanofi Pasteur and emerging markets.

French drugmaker Sanofi SA terminated a partnership with Lexicon Pharmaceuticals Inc. to develop and manufacture a drug for use with insulin in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration declined to approve AstraZeneca Plc’s diabetes treatment Farxiga for use as a supplement to insulin in adults with a rare type of the condition.

The United States pays more per capita for prescription drugs than any other country in the world, which is a huge concern for patients and insurance providers.

Novo Nordisk’s diabetes drug Victoza (liraglutide) earned approval from the U.S. FDA for an expanded indication for use in children ages 10 to 17 years who have type 2 diabetes.

Insulin-dependent patients with T2D saw a significant drop in blood sugar levels after wearing Abbott’s continuous glucose monitoring system compared with those who use routine fingerstick testing.