Johnson & Johnson will contribute up to $1 billion more to a potential settlement of lawsuits alleging the New Brunswick, New Jersey-based drugmaker and other companies fueled the U.S. opioid epidemic, bringing J&J’s total payment to $5 billion.

Becton Dickinson and Co. reached a $60 million settlement with the attorneys general of 48 U.S. states and Washington D.C., resolving allegations the company concealed the risks of now-discontinued pelvic mesh devices.

Twenty-six drug manufacturers were sued by the attorneys general of most U.S. states and several territories, which accused them of conspiring to reduce competition and drive up generic drug prices.

The chief executive officer of OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma LP should not collect a potential $1.3 million bonus when he has been accused of contributing to the opioid epidemic, a group of state attorneys general said in a court filing.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter’s $17 billion lawsuit is the first to go to trial of more than 2,000 actions by state and local governments accusing opioid manufacturers of contributing to an epidemic linked to a record 47,600 overdose deaths in 2017, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Drug distributor McKesson Corp. agreed to pay $37 million to resolve a lawsuit by the state of West Virginia seeking to hold the company responsible for contributing to the opioid epidemic, the state’s attorney general said.

Maryland charged Insys Therapeutics Inc. with deceptively marketing a powerful opioid pain killer so that it was prescribed inappropriately beyond its intended use with cancer patients.

Insys Therapeutics Inc.’s legal woes deepened as New York’s attorney general filed a lawsuit seeking at least $75 million from the company.

Montana sued OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma LP, withdrawing from a multistate investigation by attorneys general into opioid manufacturers’ marketing practices and joining a growing list of states that have broken off to pursue individual lawsuits.

As U.S. consumer outrage grows over prescription drug prices, state authorities and patient advocates in Maryland are preparing to enforce the nation’s first law designed to punish drugmaker price-gouging.