GlaxoSmithKline is investing heavily in a Montana manufacturing facility that specializes in the manufacture of the company’s two-year-old shingles vaccine Shingrix, which is eying blockbuster status.

At least $14 billion is needed to accelerate the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria and quell stubborn epidemics that still kill millions, the head of a global health fund said.

Two antimalarial strategies have been published from Imperial College London: new compounds that prevent the malaria parasite from infecting mosquitoes and gene-edited mosquitoes that cannot reproduce, leading to population destruction.

Pfizer will pay German biotech firm BioNTech up to $425 million in an alliance to develop more effective influenza jabs, the latest major pharma company to bank on a promising new genetic approach.

The U.S. FDA approved 60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals’ Arakoda (tafenoquine) tablets for the prevention of malaria in patients aged 18 years and older.

Gene-editing technologies that alter mosquitoes’ DNA could prove critical in the fight against malaria, Bill Gates said, and ethical concerns should not block progress in such gene-modifying research.

Novartis announced a five-year commitment in the fight against malaria. The Swiss-based company will invest more than $100 million to advance research and the development of “next-generation treatments” to combat emerging resistance to artemisinin and other currently used antimalarials.

German biotech firm CureVac secured more financial backing for vaccine development projects from its investor the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, working on jabs to prevent malaria and influenza.

Research carried out in part by an artificially intelligent ‘robot scientist’ found that a common ingredient of toothpaste could be developed to fight drug-resistant strains of malaria.

Proposed United States budget cuts could put in jeopardy great progress in reducing global poverty and disease and lead to 5 million more deaths from AIDS alone, the philanthropist Bill Gates warned.