Martin Shkreli received his second lifetime ban from the pharmaceutical industry. One month after U.S. District Court Judge Denise Cotes banned the “Pharma Bro” from future involvement in the industry, a second judge handed down a similar order and ordered him to pay a $1.39 million fine.

A U.S. judge on January 14 barred Martin Shkreli from the pharmaceutical industry for life and ordered him to pay $64.6 million after he famously raised the price of the drug Daraprim and fought to block generic competitors.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and seven states on December 7 settled claims accusing Vyera Pharmaceuticals of trying to block generic versions of the company’s life-saving drug Daraprim, but are preparing for a Dec. 14 trial against accused mastermind Martin Shkreli.

With the Thanksgiving holiday upon us, BioSpace felt it was important to give thanks for some of the positive things that have happened during 2021. And there are many! The accomplishments, opportunities and possibilities the scientific community has brought to bear, providing a way out of the COVID-19 pandemic and hope for the future of meaningful therapies for several challenging diseases, deserve a major shout-out.

The Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint in federal court against Vyera Pharmaceuticals, the company formerly known as Turing Pharmaceuticals that Martin Shkreli founded, alleging an “elaborate anticompetitive scheme to preserve a monopoly” on Daraprim.

The FDA approved San Diego-based Retrophin Inc.’s 100 mg and 300 mg tablets of Thiola EC (tiopronin) to treat cystinuria.

The year 2018 saw a number of significant triumphs in the biopharma industry – increased numbers of drug approvals and near record-shattering IPOs, but the industry also saw its share of blemishes and black eyes from various corners of the globe.

According to a drug shortage list provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, there have been more than 100 drugs that have faced shortages during 2018.

Adamis Pharmaceuticals is selling U.S. commercial rights to Symjepi, a competitor to Mylan’s EpiPen, to Novartis.

A U.S. judge ordered former drug company exec Martin Shkreli to forfeit $7.36 million following his conviction of defrauding investors.