Telehealth boomed during the pandemic, and experts believe that even with the world opening back up, pharma companies will have to continue to shift and strengthen tactics to reach physicians and patients virtually.

Greater Than One Chief Technology Officer Ken Winell explores and offers considerations to how innovation and changes in telemedicine can fit comfortably, and successfully, into the U.S. healthcare ecosystem.

The impact of the global pandemic has been felt across all facets of life, including medical care. Telehealth, which was already gaining in popularity, received a major boost as a result of COVID: Before the pandemic, 56 percent of Americans did not believe they could receive the same level of care from telehealth compared to in-person care, but recent polling shows nearly 80 percent of Americans now say it is possible.

Although the endocannabinoid system has been intensely studied, there are still few drugs approved or in development that interact with it.

Yuval Cohen, Ph.D., CEO of Corbus Pharmaceuticals Holdings, spoke with Med Ad News about what the endocannabinoid system is, Corbus’ pipeline of drugs, and why he thinks there will be a flood of drugs targeting the endocannabinoid system.

Data and AI scientists must strive to eliminate bias from anything that touches patient care.

Clinical trial recruitment is notoriously difficult. Finding, vetting, qualifying, and managing trial participants is time-consuming and expensive, with numerous obstacles hindering every step of the arduous process. From precise patient identification to compelling behavioral motivation, traditional approaches often fall short and cost pharma companies millions of dollars and months if not years of delays in drug development. 

The World Health Organization defines health technology as “the application of organized knowledge and skills in the form of devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures, and systems developed to solve a health problem and improve quality of lives.” While that’s true, it’s a pretty broad statement. In an era when we’re seeing rapid technological shifts in the way people measure, monitor, and think about their health, it’s worth focusing any discussion of health technology to a few key areas that best highlight some of the more exciting – and challenging – aspects of health technology development at this point in 2021.

As the grip of the pandemic eases, managed market executives on the pharma and agency side will have to modify their tactics with payers due to changed habits; at the same time, payers’ expectations of value remain strong.

Children growing up watching The Wizard of Oz remember the first time they saw little Toto pull the curtain back, exposing the Great and Powerful Oz as just a man. And even though he exhorted, “Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!”—from that day forward, the gig was up. Today, if Toto were to expose how healthcare is paid for in the United States, we would realize that it’s the employer who is “that man behind the curtain.” And although pharmaceutical manufacturers still need to focus their attention on the intermediary companies—like UnitedHealth and Aetna, for example—it is becoming extremely important that they understand the pressure that employers are placing on these companies.