The Lancet published CanSino Biologics Inc.’s Phase III clinical trial results on the safety and efficacy of the company’s recombinant novel coronavirus vaccine, Convidecia.

The inexpensive antidepressant fluvoxamine might help keep patients with Covid-19 from developing severe disease, according to a study published in The Lancet Global Health. Researchers found in another study that the coronavirus can infect cells of the inner ear, which may help explain the balance problems, hearing loss and tinnitus (ringing in the ears) experienced by some Covid-19 patients.

Evidence is emerging that not only can Covid-19 vaccines help prevent long Covid, but they could serve as a form of “rescue” for those already stricken with the condition.

The effectiveness of the Pfizer Inc./BioNTech SE vaccine in preventing infection by the coronavirus dropped to 47 percent from 88 percent six months after the second dose, according to data published on Oct. 4 that U.S. health agencies considered when deciding on the need for booster shots.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago published what they are calling a “first of its kind study” that found a possible direct link between neurodegenerative diseases and the herpesvirus.

Additional Covid-19 vaccine booster shots are not needed for the general population, leading scientists including two departing senior U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials and several from the World Health Organization (WHO) said in an article published in a medical journal on Sept. 13.

The body of real-world evidence around Covid-19 continues to build, and a study released Aug. 26 in The Lancet points to concerning long-term effects for hospital survivors at the one-year mark. 

AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine carries a small extra risk of rare blood clots with low platelets after the first dose and no extra risk after the second, a study led and funded by the drugmaker showed on July 28, after worries over side effects.

Eli Lilly’s investigational diabetes drug tirzepatide is showing significant promise in targeting A1C levels and weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes, including those who had never been previously treated for the disease. In other positive clinical results presented at the American Diabetes Association’s 81st Scientific Sessions meeting, Novo Nordisk data demonstrated an investigational 2mg dose of injectable Ozempic (semaglutide) generated statistically significant and superior reductions in A1C compared to a 1mg dose of Ozempic.

A sense of urgency, powerful science, relentless ingenuity, hope and trust drove the development of Pfizer and BioNTech’s mRNA vaccine during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic. As the crisis appears to lessen, Pfizer is preparing for the next pandemic.