U.S. President Donald Trump signed four executive orders aiming at lowering prices that Americans pay for prescription drugs as he faces an uphill re-election battle and criticism over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Novartis AG agreed to pay more than $729 million to settle U.S. government charges that the company paid illegal kickbacks to doctors and patients to boost drug sales, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

Pfizer Inc. filed a lawsuit seeking to require the federal government to let it help Medicare beneficiaries afford two drugs to treat a rare and sometimes fatal heart condition, and which cost $225,000 a year.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals said the company will vigorously defend federal charges of being involved in a kickback scheme to bolster sales of the blockbuster macular degeneration drug Eylea.

Medical diagnostic firm PerkinElmer Inc. faces a federal investigation into the company’s role in an alleged Medicare fraud involving tens of thousands of unnecessary genetic cancer tests, according to three sources with knowledge of the probe and documents reviewed by Reuters.

With impeachment behind us and the elections looming, both parties are focused on healthcare, the policy topic of greatest concern to voters. More specifically, they are focused on lowering the cost of prescription drugs.

The price of prescription drugs was a central issue in last night’s Democratic presidential debate as candidates pointed out ways they would use the power of the federal government to lower the cost of medications in the United States.

CVS Health Corp. and the drugstore chain’s Omnicare unit were sued by the U.S. government, which accused them of fraudulently billing Medicare and other programs for drugs for older and disabled people without valid prescriptions.

A U.S. government watchdog is raising fresh concerns that health insurers are exaggerating how sick Medicare patients are, receiving billions of dollars in improper payments as a result.

The Assistance Fund will pay $4 million to resolve claims that the Florida-based charity acted as a conduit for companies including Biogen Inc. and Novartis AG to pay kickbacks to Medicare patients using their high-priced multiple sclerosis drugs, the U.S. Justice Department said.