Biogen Inc. is providing the company’s controversial and expensive new Alzheimer’s drug free of charge for some patients amid slow claim reviews by Medicare, according to sources familiar with the situation, including a doctor treating patients with the drug.

President Joe Biden on Aug. 12 called on U.S. lawmakers to enact legislation aimed at lowering drug prices, including allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices and imposing penalties on drugmakers that hike prices faster than inflation.

Abbott Laboratories will pay $160 million to resolve claims that two of the company’s units submitted false claims to Medicare by providing kickbacks to diabetes patients, including “free” or “no cost” glucose monitors, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

Biogen Inc.’s Alzheimer’s drug, the first new treatment for the memory-robbing disease in nearly 20 years, hit new barriers on July 15 with some large hospitals declining to use Aduhelm and health insurers delaying a decision while awaiting coverage terms from Medicare.

The U.S. government started a review process for national Medicare coverage of Biogen Inc.’s Alzheimer’s drug Aduhelm that was approved during June 2021 by the country’s health regulator.

After collecting billions of dollars in U.S. coronavirus aid, many of the nation’s wealthiest nonprofit hospitals are tapping into disaster relief funds that critics say they do not need.

Biogen Inc. agreed to pay $22 million to resolve U.S. allegations that the company illegally used two charities that help cover Medicare patients’ out-of-pocket drug costs as a means to pay them kickbacks to use the Cambridge, Mass-based drugmaker’s multiple sclerosis medicines.

Mallinckrodt filed for bankruptcy protection, saddled with lawsuits alleging the company helped fuel the U.S. opioid epidemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on the need for effective tools for quality measurement and reporting initiatives. Both Medicare and Medicaid are being impacted by changes to the way care is delivered and data is captured.

Gilead Sciences agreed to pay $97 million to resolve claims from the U.S. government that the company violated the False Claims Act.