New Klick Health research published in Nature Digital Medicine says physicians could get a more comprehensive view of their patients’ health – and even help predict chronic disease early by assessing the interdependence of their health indicators and the body’s homeostasis system that controls them.

The COVID-19 pandemic sparked national concern about vulnerabilities in the drug supply chain. Many drugs procured in the United States are manufactured abroad. The pandemic disrupted the production of key pharmaceutical ingredients around the world, sparking fear about resulting shortages of key medicines. The system also struggled to keep pace with rising demand for drugs to treat patients with COVID-19. During this webinar, panelists will explore the impact of the pandemic on different facets of the drug supply chain and discuss policy options to strengthen the system.

Shortages of some life-saving antibiotics are putting growing numbers of patients at risk and fueling the evolution of “superbugs” that do not respond to modern medicines, according to a new report.

“As we continue to confront the staggering human and economic toll created by opioid abuse and addiction, we’re focused on taking actions that reduce the scope of new addiction by decreasing unnecessary exposure to opioids. …”

Drugmakers are racing to implement Brexit contingency plans to prepare for a jolt to their regulatory system as the EMA is uprooted from London to Amsterdam.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a comprehensive policy framework for the development and oversight of regenerative medicine products, including novel cellular therapies.

Shanghai Pharmaceuticals Holding Co. agreed to buy Cardinal Health Inc.’s China drug distribution business for $557 million, winning a highly competitive auction in a move that will greatly expand its presence nationwide.

Supplies of thousands of medicines are at risk of disruption if Britain leaves the European Union without a trade deal, forcing manufacturers to prepare for duplicate product testing to ensure their drugs stay on the market.

U.S. scientists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young won the 2017 Nobel prize for medicine for unraveling molecular mechanisms that control our internal body clocks.