Checkpoint inhibitor pioneer James P. Allison, who won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine, will helm a new research and innovation hub at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center that is focused on developing new immunotherapy breakthroughs in oncology.

Virologist Luc Montagnier passed away, French news agency AFP reported on February 10. Montagnier won a Nobel Prize for his part in discovering the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS,

American scientists David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian won the 2021 Nobel Prize for Medicine on Oct. 4 for the discovery of receptors in the skin that sense temperature and touch and could pave the way for new pain-killers.

Clarivate Plc released the company’s list of Highly Cited Researchers 2020 that identifies researchers who “demonstrated significant influence in their chosen field or fields through the publication of multiple highly cited papers during the last decade.”

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for their discovery and development of CRISPR gene editing.

Three scientists will share the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their seminal discoveries that led to the identification of the Hepatitis C virus, a significant health problem across the globe that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer in patients.

Three researchers jointly received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their work in understanding how oxygen levels affect cellular metabolism and physiological function.

With the books closed on another ASCO meeting, it’s clear to see that checkpoint inhibitors keep showing a promise.

Two Americans and a Briton won the 2018 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for harnessing the power of evolution to generate novel proteins.

U.S. scientists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young won the 2017 Nobel prize for medicine for unraveling molecular mechanisms that control our internal body clocks.