Privately held pharmaceutical company Wraser Pharmaceuticals announced the publication of a White Paper addressing opioid safety.

Trevena Inc.’s opioid injection to treat acute pain could be abused and potentially lead to overdose, staff reviewers of the U.S. FDA said, sending the drugmaker’s shares down 66 percent.

Minnesota became the latest state to sue Insys Therapeutics Inc., accusing the drugmaker of illegally marketing a powerful fentanyl-based pain medicine, while a former employee pleaded guilty in New Jersey over bribing doctors to prescribe the drug.

France’s competition authority fined U.S. healthcare group Johnson & Johnson 25 million euros ($29.6 million) after it ruled the company had deliberately slowed market access to generic copies of its painkiller Durogesic.

The billionaire founder of Insys Therapeutics Inc. appeared in federal court in Boston to plead not guilty to charges that he participated in a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe a fentanyl-based cancer pain drug.

The billionaire founder of Insys Therapeutics Inc. was arrested on U.S. charges that he participated in a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe a fentanyl-based cancer pain drug, marking a step by authorities to fight the opioid epidemic.

As U.S. President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, Europe should heed the threat from opioids responsible for America’s deadliest drug epidemic in decades as both regions have seen rises in prescription rates of such medicines, which can be a gateway to dangerous derivatives according to experts.

President Donald Trump’s pick for U.S. drug czar withdrew after it become public that he spearheaded a bill that undercut the government’s power to crack down on opioid makers that were flooding the market with the addictive painkillers.

Arizona-based Insys has been plagued by kickback accusations regarding marketing of its fentanyl-based cancer pain medication Subsys, a sublingual spray. Multiple states – including New Jersey, Massachusetts and Arizona – have accused the company of fraud in order to boost sales. The company said it has replaced the bulk of its management team along with 90 percent of its original sales staff and commercial operatives.

Arizona sued Insys Therapeutics Inc., accusing the drugmaker of engaging in a fraudulent marketing scheme aimed at increasing sales of a fentanyl-based cancer pain medicine called Subsys.