A founder of a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy whose mold-tainted drugs sparked a deadly U.S. fungal meningitis outbreak in 2012 was resentenced on July 7 to 14-1/2 years in prison after a federal appeals court overturned his earlier 9-year term.

Endo International Plc said two units filed a lawsuit accusing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of ignoring key components of a law passed after a deadly 2012 meningitis outbreak linked to a compounding pharmacy.

A federal prosecutor told jurors that a Massachusetts pharmacist gambled with patients’ lives by making drugs in unsafe ways that led to a deadly 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak, but a defense lawyer said he was not a murderer.

The head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said the agency is working on a new policy that would encourage more compounding pharmacies to register under a law enacted in the wake of a deadly 2012 meningitis outbreak linked to one such company.

The co-founder of a now-defunct Massachusetts compounding pharmacy was found guilty of racketeering and fraud but cleared of murder for his role in a 2012 meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people across the United States.