IM Therapeutics is developing a personalized, orally available small molecule therapeutic for diabetes.

Biopharmaceutical companies need to look beyond the usual targets when addressing neurodegenerative disorders and also must work to correlate genetic changes to cognitive changes in patients, according to panelists at BIO’s on-demand session, “Battle of the Brains: Rethinking Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment.”

The pharmaceutical industry has never been more exciting. At the dawn of this new decade, we are seeing incredible scientific breakthroughs in the industry. Gene therapy is becoming a reality, clinical diagnostics combined with treatments are paving the path for personalized medicine, and often under-represented diseases, like sickle cell disease and spinal muscular atrophy, are seeing not just one new treatment, but multiple life-changing solutions entering the market in 2019 and continuing in 2020. With all this change and excitement, there has been a whole lot of change within brand marketing organizations.

Roche Holding AG priced the company’s personalized cancer treatment Rozlytrek at about $17,050 per month, nearly half of the monthly price of a rival drug from Bayer AG and Eli Lilly and Co. that was approved during 2018.

Swiss drugmaker Roche’s push into personalized cancer medicines hit a milestone with Japanese approval of a new drug, Rozlytrek, that targets patients who must be identified via genetic profiling.

French healthcare company Sanofi teamed up with Google to work on innovations, aimed at using emerging data technologies to change how medicines and health services will be delivered in future.

The first rule of rare: There are no rules. There are over 7,000 different rare diseases – each with its own symptomology, history, and clinical and political landscape. Most are virgin territory for marketers; only 5 percent have an approved treatment.

Adaptive Biotechnologies announced a worldwide collaboration and license agreement with Genentech – a member of the Roche Group – to develop, manufacture and commercialize novel neoantigen directed T-cell therapies for the treatment of a broad range of cancers.

Personalized medicine continues to grow in importance, and having the ability to monitor health data has proven to be a significant desire for people as the number of wearable devices continues to grow.

Chinese manufacturer Cellular Biomedicine has been enlisted to make Novartis’ $475,000 gene-modifying cancer treatment Kymriah as the Swiss drugmaker intends to win approval for the therapy in the world’s most populous country.