Zolgensma’s successful market uptake by payers may hold lessons for other manufacturers of costly gene therapies.

Physician-patient engagement has changed rapidly and significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, with remote conferencing and digital communications becoming increasingly important, according to a new survey of 500 U.S physicians by health and wellness marketing agency AbelsonTaylor.

Abbott Laboratories won U.S. marketing approval for a diagnostic test for the coronavirus that can deliver results to patients within minutes and be used in physicians’ offices and urgent care clinics, as well as hospitals.

COVID-19 has forced the life science industry to embrace digital engagement with HCPs at scale. But, remote detailing is not going to be successful unless pharma can offer value, according to OKRA Technologies.

Those pesky ones and zeros lurked behind virtually every key trend in pharma marketing in 2019, and their influence will only grow in 2020.

In essence, we all want those boots on the ground to drive commercial value. Yet, not every high-priced pair of shoes delivers the desired ROI. Physician access time or practice location, and position of the brand in its life cycle, often make the cost of deploying a traditional field rep undesirable. Yet, many brands benefit from a personal visit to the office.

Physicians, residents and students expect that almost a third of their duties could be automated by technology in the next 20 years, according to the results of a national survey commissioned by Stanford Medicine and published in January.

The first of the Insys Therapeutics executives found guilty of violating the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act in May 2019 was sentenced to 33 months in federal prison.

French researchers are developing what they say is the most powerful Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner in the world, which will use a supermagnet the weight of a blue whale and should allow earlier diagnosis of diseases such as Parkinson’s.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts’ Alternative Quality Contract slowed the rate of medical spending growth by up to 12 percent while improving patient care over the course of eight years, according to a Harvard Medical School study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.