As some U.S. states look to start reopening their coronavirus-battered economies amid protests from supporters of President Donald Trump anxious to get back to work, hardest hit New York state began mandating the wearing of masks or face coverings in public to contain the pathogen’s spread.

The coronavirus outbreak could reach its peak in the United States this week, a top U.S. health official said as more signs of stabilization emerged, but political leaders said a reopening of the economy may hinge on more widespread testing.

With impeachment behind us and the elections looming, both parties are focused on healthcare, the policy topic of greatest concern to voters. More specifically, they are focused on lowering the cost of prescription drugs.

U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders proposed spending $1.5 trillion over 10 years to create a universal child care and early education system, to be funded by taxing the wealthiest Americans.

Chants of “H.R. 3” broke out in the House of Representatives chamber during the 2020 State of the Union Address as Democratic lawmakers urged action on the bill passed late last year that could impact the price of prescription medications paid for by government-funded health programs.

The price of prescription drugs was a central issue in last night’s Democratic presidential debate as candidates pointed out ways they would use the power of the federal government to lower the cost of medications in the United States.

Perhaps no issue has divided the field of Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls more than the debate over “Medicare for All.”

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Celgene Corp. won U.S. antitrust approval for their merger on condition that they sell Celgene’s psoriasis drug Otezla.

U.S. President Donald Trump will unveil an executive order aimed at strengthening Medicare for seniors, seeking to improve the health program’s fiscal position and offer more affordable plan options, administration officials said.

Congressional Democrats threatened to subpoena Juul Labs if the e-cigarette maker does not provide documents relating to the company’s products and marketing practices, as a House panel looks into whether Juul deliberately targeted children.