U.S. lawmakers from both parties and both houses of Congress introduced eight antitrust bills aimed at tackling the problem of high and rising drug prices, including bills to stop brand name drug companies from paying generic firms to stay off the market.

President Joe Biden scored his first legislative win as the House of Representatives passed his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package early Feb. 27, though Democrats face challenges to their hopes of using the bill to raise the minimum wage.

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said lawmakers will begin work on a robust Covid-19 relief package as early as next week, while the White House denied any plan for a scaled-back bill that could move quickly through the divided chamber.

Economic relief and a vaccine drew nearer to reality to counter a coronavirus pandemic that has ravaged the U.S. economy and killed 286,487 people with year-end holiday gatherings expected to fuel another surge in infections.

Former U.S. Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton said they were willing to be vaccinated against the novel coronavirus on television in order to ease any public skepticism over the safety of new vaccines.

Coronavirus cases continued their grim climb in the United States with Midwestern states experiencing record hospitalizations, as increasingly bitter rhetoric kept the virus front and center of campaigning two days before the presidential election.

New York, New Jersey and Connecticut urged their residents to not travel between the three states as the U.S. Northeast sees a rise in Covid-19 cases, while California said major theme parks including Disneyland would not be opening anytime soon.

Drug companies’ political committees have largely donated to Republican presidential campaigns since 1990, but that trend has noticeably reversed come the 2020 election cycle, according to a new report from the Center for Responsive Politics.

Sander Flaum, Principal of Flaum Navigators, believes that it’s absolutely essential that healthcare access is improved in the United States, but he has no confidence that anyone in Washington has the courage or clout to enact the substantial changes that need to be made.

A top U.S. health official told a U.S. Senate committee that he expects Covid-19 vaccinations to take place over many months and that most Americans could be vaccinated by July 2021 at the latest.