Pfizer Chief Executive Officer Albert Bourla said his company supports Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus-focused plan that is intended to boost vaccination efforts and address the pandemic.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden said he would order increased production of syringes and other supplies to ramp up vaccinations against Covid-19 and improve upon the Trump administration rollout that he called a “dismal failure.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned health care personnel not to make any changes to the dosing of Covid-19 vaccines and that doing so would place the public health at risk and undermine “the historic vaccination effort to protect the population.”

As Operation Warp Speed – the Trump administration’s program to develop and distribute a Covid-19 vaccine – struggles to ramp up vaccinations, one of the approaches under consideration is cutting the doses of the Moderna vaccine.

Millions of Covid-19 vaccines were sitting unused in U.S. hospitals and elsewhere a week into the massive inoculation campaign, putting the government’s target for 20 million vaccinations during December in doubt.

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence received his Covid-19 vaccine live on television on Dec. 18, seeking to shore up public support for vaccinations after U.S. deaths from the coronavirus topped 3,000 for a third straight day.

Former U.S. Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton said they were willing to be vaccinated against the novel coronavirus on television in order to ease any public skepticism over the safety of new vaccines.

UW Health University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin has been rushing to convert available space into units for Covid-19 patients, as the state’s medical facilities struggle to keep pace with a surge in new infections.

The United States saw the country’s highest-ever number of new Covid-19 cases in the past two days, keeping the pandemic a top election issue as Vice President Mike Pence travels the U.S. to campaign despite close aides testing positive.

Premiums for an average health insurance plan under the Affordable Care Act dropped by 2% for the 2021 coverage year, according to a report released by the Trump administration, which is seeking to invalidate the 2010 healthcare law.