Several Covid-19 vaccine developers, including Pfizer Inc., Johnson & Johnson and Moderna Inc., plan to issue a public pledge not to seek government approval until their vaccine candidates are proven to be safe and effective, the Wall Street Journal reported.

AstraZeneca Plc has begun enrolling adults for a U.S.-funded, 30,000-subject late-stage study of the company’s high-profile Covid-19 vaccine candidate.

More than 700 companies have joined Time to Vote, a business-led, nonpartisan coalition that aims to increase voter participation in the U.S. elections.

U.S. President Donald Trump signed four executive orders designed to reduce drug costs for consumers, in a bid to highlight his commitment to cutting prescription prices ahead of the November presidential election.

This extraordinary March and April – marked by rising numbers of Covid-19 cases and fatalities, suffering for patients and families, courageous efforts by clinicians, restricted social interaction, business closings, massive unemployment – has battered our healthcare system and economy. Here are a few early thoughts on how the evolving pandemic has changed the outlook for health policy after the November elections.

U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders proposed spending $1.5 trillion over 10 years to create a universal child care and early education system, to be funded by taxing the wealthiest Americans.

As the 2020 presidential election looms, debate about the price of prescription drugs and healthcare will intensify; healthcare communication leaders share their thoughts on how their pharma clients can be a constructive part of the conversations.

Leading topics of the 2020 J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference included a general lack of big deals, defining digital health, and biopharma’s diversity problem.

With the 2020 elections looming though, and lawmakers across the country drafting legislation aimed at curbing price increases, some companies are carefully examining the landscape as they approach pricing.

About a quarter of the dollars spent on healthcare in the United States may be wasted, a new analysis suggests.