U.S. lawmakers attempting to cut the cost of insulin for more than a million Americans to $35 per month are unlikely to succeed as November elections draw near and complicate bipartisan support, health policy and political experts say.

The Accelerated Approval Integrity Act of 2022 (H.R. 6963) aims to remove loopholes in the Food and Drug Administration’s accelerated approval pathway. The bill, however, fails to adequately consider the whole picture, and may inadvertently remove medications that simply can’t complete confirmatory trials within the narrow timeframe allowed.

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on March 22 he intends to hold votes this spring on a bill that would cap the cost of insulin, a life-sustaining diabetes drug.

A group of state attorneys general unveiled on July 21 a landmark $26 billion settlement with large drug companies for allegedly fueling the deadly nationwide opioid epidemic, but the deal still requires support from thousands of local governments.

The Coalition for Healthcare Communication will present a special post-election webinar on Nov. 19 featuring Kate Rawson – senior editor of Prevision Policy and an experienced, well-connected inside-the-beltway observer – with a more in-depth look at implications of the 2020 elections for healthcare policy.

This extraordinary March and April – marked by rising numbers of Covid-19 cases and fatalities, suffering for patients and families, courageous efforts by clinicians, restricted social interaction, business closings, massive unemployment – has battered our healthcare system and economy. Here are a few early thoughts on how the evolving pandemic has changed the outlook for health policy after the November elections.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman and Republican Chuck Grassley and the panel’s leading Democrat, Senator Ron Wyden, announced a bipartisan proposal to lower the Rx drug prices.

Lawmakers on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee urged the Trump administration to conduct a scientific review of a Justice Department-backed bill to classify all illicit chemical knockoffs of the potent painkiller fentanyl in the same legal category as heroin.

Maine could soon prohibit parents from citing religious or personal beliefs to avoid vaccinating their children, making the U.S. state one of a half dozen cracking down during the nations’ largest measles outbreak in 25 years.

The data privacy landscape in the U.S. is continuing to change rapidly.