The Coalition for Healthcare Communication will present a special post-election webinar on Nov. 19 featuring Kate Rawson – senior editor of Prevision Policy and an experienced, well-connected inside-the-beltway observer – with a more in-depth look at implications of the 2020 elections for healthcare policy.

This extraordinary March and April – marked by rising numbers of Covid-19 cases and fatalities, suffering for patients and families, courageous efforts by clinicians, restricted social interaction, business closings, massive unemployment – has battered our healthcare system and economy. Here are a few early thoughts on how the evolving pandemic has changed the outlook for health policy after the November elections.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman and Republican Chuck Grassley and the panel’s leading Democrat, Senator Ron Wyden, announced a bipartisan proposal to lower the Rx drug prices.

Lawmakers on the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee urged the Trump administration to conduct a scientific review of a Justice Department-backed bill to classify all illicit chemical knockoffs of the potent painkiller fentanyl in the same legal category as heroin.

Maine could soon prohibit parents from citing religious or personal beliefs to avoid vaccinating their children, making the U.S. state one of a half dozen cracking down during the nations’ largest measles outbreak in 25 years.

The data privacy landscape in the U.S. is continuing to change rapidly.

  Participating in the Blue Cross Blue Shield Alliance for Health Research, the study comes from Yale’s School of Public Health and School of Medicine   NEW HAVEN, Conn., March 22, 2019 /PRNewswire/ –State breast density notification laws that mandate reporting of mammogram results can prompt further screening and modestly boost cancer detection rates, say […]

Voters in Maine approved a ballot initiative to expand the state’s Medicaid program under Obamacare, sending a clear signal of support for the federal healthcare law to lawmakers in the state and Washington D.C.

Drugmaker Novo Nordisk warned that draft legislation in some U.S. states to make pricing more transparent could impact business in the company’s largest market.

President Donald Trump’s pick for U.S. drug czar withdrew after it become public that he spearheaded a bill that undercut the government’s power to crack down on opioid makers that were flooding the market with the addictive painkillers.