Even as lawmakers debate and malign proposed plans to lower the costs of prescription drugs in the United States, since the start of 2020, prices increased on more than 600 prescription drugs by an average of 5.2 percent.

Chants of “H.R. 3” broke out in the House of Representatives chamber during the 2020 State of the Union Address as Democratic lawmakers urged action on the bill passed late last year that could impact the price of prescription medications paid for by government-funded health programs.

Roche company Genentech announced positive top-line results from the pivotal Part 2 of the FIREFISH study looking at risdiplam in infants aged 1-7 months with Type 1 spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

In August 1963, the Rev. Martin Luther King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech that called for equality among all people, regardless of their ethnicity, as well as a vision for a better America for all. While the noble dreams that King outlined on that hot day in Washington, D.C. so many years ago have unfortunately not yet been fully realized, there are other kinds of dreams that may be closer to being achieved, particularly in the area of new medications for serious diseases.

As the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference entered the final day for 2020, a few topics rose to the top as trending, including the relative lack of big deals.

With the 2020 elections looming though, and lawmakers across the country drafting legislation aimed at curbing price increases, some companies are carefully examining the landscape as they approach pricing.

BioSpace spoke to leaders from various corners of the industry who provided their insights into what 2020 is likely to hold for their particular sphere.

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc. priced the company’s gene silencing drug to treat patients with a rare genetic disorder that can cause severe pain at $575,000 per year after receiving an early U.S. approval.

U.S. regulators halted a trial of Novartis’ Zolgensma treatment after an animal study raised safety concerns, in a setback for the drugmaker’s plan to expand the product’s use to older patients.

A look at potential new developments important to health communications and marketing.