Switzerland-based AC Immune SA announced positive interim results from the company’s ongoing Phase Ib/IIa clinical trial of ACI-35.030 for Alzheimer’s disease.

Biomarkers will be critical to developing precision medicine for Alzheimer’s disease, and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) may enable earlier and more accurate detection, according to Eli Lilly-associated researchers.

An experimental Alzheimer’s drug from Roche and AC Immune failed to slow cognitive and functional decline in a clinical trial, the Swiss companies said, in a fresh setback to efforts to fight the fatal dementia-causing disease.

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that a new blood test may be helpful for detecting Alzheimer’s disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment.

Brussels, Belgium-based UCB entered into a global licensing deal with Roche and Genentech to develop and commercialize UCB0107 in Alzheimer’s disease.

AC Immune initiated the second highest dosing group in the company’s Phase Ib/IIa clinical trial of ACI-35.030 for Alzheimer’s disease, based on encouraging interim data from the initial dosing cohort.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co.’s radioactive compound to detect tau, an important characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.

Carlsbad, California-based Ionis Pharmaceuticals licensed the company’s IONIS-MAPTRX antisense therapy to leading biotech firm Biogen Inc.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found further evidence that microglia are the key link between the accumulation of abnormal proteins, including beta-amyloid and tau, in the brain and the actual brain damage observed in Alzheimer’s patients.

As pharma companies struggle with developing a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers continue to find evidence that links the dreaded form of dementia to other medical and health issues. The latest news suggests a potential link between Alzheimer’s and menopause.