Biohaven Pharmaceutical said on May 23 the company’s experimental drug for patients with spinocerebellar ataxia, a genetic disease that affects the nervous system, failed to meet the main goal of a late-stage study.

Three patients whose lower bodies were left completely paralyzed after spinal cord injuries were able to walk, cycle and swim using a nerve-stimulation device controlled by a touchscreen tablet, researchers reported on Feb. 7.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Azurity Pharmaceuticals Inc.’s Fleqsuvy (baclofen oral suspension), 25 mg per 5 mL (5 mg/mL), Concentrated Formulation for the treatment of spasticity from multiple sclerosis or patients with spinal cord injuries and other spinal cord diseases.

Visionary tech magnate Elon Musk is taking his neurotech company to the next step toward in-human trials of his implantable brain-machine interface.  

Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis identified a compound that can help sensory neurons in the central nervous system to heal.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Roche’s Enspryng for the central nervous system disorder neuromyelitis optica, putting the Swiss drugmaker head-to-head with Alexion’s Soliris in a costly treatment area.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Viela Bio’s Uplizna (inebilizumab-cdon) for adults with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who are anti-AQP4 antibody positive.

Powered by Xconomy, November 2019’s What’s Next in Neuroscience Therapies event brought together scientists, entrepreneurs and biotech executives at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco to discuss their work developing next-generation neuroscience therapies and technologies in areas such as spinal-cord injuries, precision mental health, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The online publication NEO.LIFE pointed to seven areas where biotech companies and researchers have significant potential to “dramatically reshape our concept of what it means to be human.”

Doctors in Kentucky reported that two of four paralyzed patients were able to walk again with limited assistance after treatment with electrical stimulation to the portion of the spinal cord cut off from the brain, combined with intense physical therapy.