U.S. researchers who conducted the largest study yet into whether applying powder to the genitals increases a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer were unable to definitively put to rest the issue that has prompted thousands of lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson and other companies.

Johnson & Johnson Chief Executive Officer Alex Gorsky declined to appear at a U.S. congressional hearing on the safety of the company’s Baby Powder and other talc-based cosmetics.

Johnson & Johnson said recent tests showed that Johnson’s Baby Powder was free of asbestos, after FDA investigations reported trace amounts of the material in the product earlier in 2019.

Johnson & Johnson said recent tests showed that Johnson’s Baby Powder was free of asbestos, after FDA investigations reported trace amounts of the material in the product earlier in 2019.

Over the past 50 years, the FDA has relied upon – and often deferred to – industry even as outside experts and consumers repeatedly raised serious health concerns about talc powders and cosmetics, a Reuters investigation found.

Johnson & Johnson said 15 new tests found no asbestos in a bottle of baby powder that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says tested positive for trace amounts of asbestos, a finding the agency stands by.

Four major U.S. retailers, including Walmart and Target Corp., removed all 22-ounce bottles of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder from their stores following the healthcare conglomerate’s recall last week of some bottles due to possible asbestos contamination.

Facing off against a plaintiff’s lawyer for the first time about Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder, CEO Alex Gorsky in October 2019 insisted that the company’s iconic brand was safe.

Johnson & Johnson is recalling around 33,000 bottles of baby powder in the United States after the U.S. health regulators found trace amounts of asbestos in samples taken from a bottle purchased online.

A Missouri appeals court overturned a $110 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit by a Virginia woman who says she developed ovarian cancer after decades of using of the company’s talc-based products for feminine hygiene.