A second South Carolina jury failed to reach a verdict in the retrial of a case by a woman whose family said her long-term use of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder led to her death from asbestos-related cancer.

A California jury cleared J&J of liability in a case involving a woman who alleged that the company’s talc-based products – including its baby powder – contain asbestos and caused her cancer.

J&J topped analysts’ estimates for Q2 2018 profit and revenue with strong demand for the cancer drugs Zytiga and Darzalex.

Johnson & Johnson vowed to appeal a $4.7 billion verdict awarded to 22 women who claim asbestos-contaminated talc in the company’s products gave them ovarian cancer by arguing the plaintiffs’ science was flawed and the case should not have been heard in Missouri.

A Missouri jury ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a record $4.69 billion to 22 women who alleged the company’s talc-based products, including its baby powder, contain asbestos and caused them to develop ovarian cancer.

A Missouri appeals court threw out a $55 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit by a woman who claimed she developed ovarian cancer after using talc-based products, including J&J’s baby powder, citing a U.S. Supreme court ruling on where such cases can be brought.

A lawsuit by 22 ovarian cancer patients against Johnson & Johnson went to trial in Missouri state court, marking the largest case the company has faced over allegations its talc-based products contain cancer-causing asbestos.

A California jury ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4 million in punitive damages to a woman who said she developed cancer after being exposed to asbestos in the company’s baby powder, pushing the total damages award in the case to $25.7 million.

Johnson & Johnson and its talc suppliers were hit with a jury verdict in a lawsuit by a woman who said she developed cancer after being exposed to asbestos in the company’s Baby Powder.

Johnson & Johnson and Imerys Talc America, a unit of Imerys SA, must pay $117 million in damages in a case involving a man who said he developed cancer due to his exposure to asbestos in talc-based products, a New Jersey state court jury said.