The World Health Organization defines health technology as “the application of organized knowledge and skills in the form of devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures, and systems developed to solve a health problem and improve quality of lives.” While that’s true, it’s a pretty broad statement. In an era when we’re seeing rapid technological shifts in the way people measure, monitor, and think about their health, it’s worth focusing any discussion of health technology to a few key areas that best highlight some of the more exciting – and challenging – aspects of health technology development at this point in 2021.

According to separate studies, blood type does not affect susceptibility to Covid-19 in U.S. patients and an inhaled steroid commonly used to treat asthma can help keep patients with mild Covid-19 from getting sicker.

Amanda Powers-Han, Senior Partner and Chief Marketing Officer for Greater Than One, explores some real-life technology applications that are transforming healthcare today and tomorrow.

A study of Fitbit wearers concludes that almost 50 percent of Covid-19 cases can be detected a day before enrollees in the study reported the onset of symptoms, and with 70 percent specificity.

The Fitbit on your wrist not only counts your steps and minutes of sleep, it can also help tell if you are coming down with the flu – and warn health authorities to get ready to help.

Apple Inc. launched an app that will let users of the company’s devices to enroll in three health studies, allowing them to share health-related data for medical research.

The Bristol-Myers Squibb-Pfizer Alliance and Fitbit announced at the TIME 100 Health Summit in New York that they are working together to help drive timely diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AFib) with the aim of improving earlier detection in individuals at increased risk of stroke.

Fitbit Inc. won a contract with the Singapore government to provide fitness trackers and services to up to one million of the country’s citizens as part of a health initiative that begins in October 2019.

The Apple Watch was able to detect irregular heart pulse rates that could signal the need for further monitoring for a serious heart rhythm problem, according to data from a large study funded by Apple Inc.

Fitbit launched the company’s cheapest smartwatch to defend its position as the second-largest seller of smartwatches after Apple.