If you flip through history, you’ll realize that our fundamental healthcare needs haven’t changed since the year 1885. We still seek rest when we’re ill, feel pain when we overexert ourselves, and need guidance from experts on our health and wellness. But the tools we have to meet these perennial needs have shifted dramatically since the 19th century, and especially over the past decade, wherein technology has advanced faster than even the greatest Sci-Fi film producers imagined, according to Greater Than One Chief Technology Officer Ken Winell.

A new research study by Klick Health and ThinkNow reveals significant cultural differences in the way Hispanics deal with their health – reinforcing the need for cross-cultural marketing programs by healthcare companies targeting this growing population segment.

A federal judge on March 21 said Apple Inc. must face a Silicon Valley company’s claims it illegally monopolized the U.S. market for heart rate monitoring apps for the Apple Watch.

Google-owned Fitbit recalled more than a million of the company’s Ionic smartwatches following reports that overheating batteries had caused burn injuries, the U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said on March 2.

The World Health Organization defines health technology as “the application of organized knowledge and skills in the form of devices, medicines, vaccines, procedures, and systems developed to solve a health problem and improve quality of lives.” While that’s true, it’s a pretty broad statement. In an era when we’re seeing rapid technological shifts in the way people measure, monitor, and think about their health, it’s worth focusing any discussion of health technology to a few key areas that best highlight some of the more exciting – and challenging – aspects of health technology development at this point in 2021.

According to separate studies, blood type does not affect susceptibility to Covid-19 in U.S. patients and an inhaled steroid commonly used to treat asthma can help keep patients with mild Covid-19 from getting sicker.

Amanda Powers-Han, Senior Partner and Chief Marketing Officer for Greater Than One, explores some real-life technology applications that are transforming healthcare today and tomorrow.

A study of Fitbit wearers concludes that almost 50 percent of Covid-19 cases can be detected a day before enrollees in the study reported the onset of symptoms, and with 70 percent specificity.

The Fitbit on your wrist not only counts your steps and minutes of sleep, it can also help tell if you are coming down with the flu – and warn health authorities to get ready to help.

Apple Inc. launched an app that will let users of the company’s devices to enroll in three health studies, allowing them to share health-related data for medical research.