A federal appeals court panel expressed skepticism to Democratic calls to overturn the ruling of a Texas judge who found the landmark U.S. healthcare reform law unconstitutional.

Encompass Health Corp. agreed to pay $48 million to resolve allegations that the company violated the False Claims Act, the U.S. Justice Department said.

Mallinckrodt Plc tentatively agreed to pay $15.4 million to resolve a U.S. Justice Department probe into how a drugmaker that the company now owns marketed an expensive treatment for a rare infant seizure disorder and multiple sclerosis.

Astellas and Amgen will pay nearly $125 million to resolve claims they used charities that help cover Medicare patients’ out-of-pocket drug costs as a way to pay kickbacks aimed at encouraging the use of their high-priced medications.

Indivior Plc lost three-quarters of the company’s stock market value and former parent Reckitt Benckiser also fell after the U.S. Justice Department accused the British drugmaker of illegally boosting prescriptions for the blockbuster opioid addiction treatment Suboxone.

Three drugmakers will pay $122.6 million to resolve claims they used charities that help cover Medicare patients’ out-of-pocket drug costs as a way to pay kickbacks aimed at encouraging the use of their medications.

Germany-based dialysis clinic operator Fresenius Medical Care AG will pay about $231 million to resolve criminal and civil allegations that the company paid bribes to public health and government officials in a variety of countries in order to win or retain business, the U.S. Justice Department.

A Missouri Supreme Court ruling on talc lawsuits could reduce the liability and number of large trials Johnson & Johnson faces over allegations the company’s talc products, including baby powder, cause cancer.

Johnson & Johnson received subpoenas from the U.S. Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission related to litigation involving alleged asbestos contamination in the company’s signature Baby Powder product line.

The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit seeking to stop a nonprofit in Philadelphia from opening what could become the nation’s first supervised drug-injection site in an effort aimed at addressing opioid abuse.