There is a much higher risk of brain blood clots from Covid-19 infection than there is from vaccines against the disease, British researchers said on April 15, after the rollout of inoculations was disrupted by reports of rare clots.

Six months after a Covid-19 diagnosis, more than 33 percent of people exhibited some form of brain damage, according to a study appearing in Lancet Psychiatry.

Oxford, U.K.-based Vaccitech reportedly filed confidentially in the United States for an initial public offering (IPO) on the Nasdaq.

The United States may not need AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine, even if it wins U.S. regulatory approval, Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease doctor told Reuters on April 1.

AstraZeneca released primary analysis showing that the company’s AZD1222 vaccine demonstrated 76 percent efficacy against symptomatic Covid-19, 100 percent efficacy against severe or critical disease and hospitalizations, and 85 percent efficacy against symptomatic Covid-19 in people 65 years and older.

Vaccitech, which partnered with AstraZeneca and Oxford University on the development and manufacturing of that company’s Covid-19 vaccine, raised $168 million in a Series B financing round that will be used to support development of its own lead candidates in oncology and infectious disease.

A World Health Organization (WHO) vaccine safety panel said on March 17 that it considers that the benefits of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine outweigh its risks and recommends that vaccinations continue.

Preliminary data from a study conducted at the University of Oxford indicates that the Covid-19 vaccine developed by AstraZeneca is effective against the Brazilian variant P1, a source with knowledge of the study told Reuters on March 5.

The gout medication colchicine will be tested in a large UK study looking into potential early-stage Covid-19 treatments and enrollment criteria was widened for the latest arm of the trial, University of Oxford researchers said on March 3.

AstraZeneca and Oxford University’s Covid-19 vaccine is more effective when its second dose is given three months after the first, instead of six weeks, a peer-reviewed study published in The Lancet medical journal showed on Feb. 19.