A study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases found that the Pfizer-BioNTech, Oxford-AstraZeneca or Moderna vaccines resulted in a drop in “long-haul” Covid-19 by 50 percent. According to data collected by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), more than 500,000 children tested positive in the United States for Covid-19 from August 5 to August 26.

In line with growing concerns that certain Covid-19 vaccines are causing unusual blood clotting problems, a group of scientists from the U.K. conducted a massive study on the link between vaccinations and dropping platelet counts and found that the problem lies more on the virus itself than on the medications. 

A group of scientists from the Nuffield Department of Women’s & Reproductive Health at Oxford University may have found a potential key to finally treating endometriosis, a disease that affects around 176 million women worldwide. 

A British public health study found that protection from either of the two most commonly used Covid-19 vaccines against the prevalent Delta variant of the coronavirus weakens within three months.

Second-quarter 2021 sales of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine more than tripled to $894 million from the first quarter, but the drugmaker on July 29 again delayed the U.S. application for approval as the company gathers more data for submissions.

AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine carries a small extra risk of rare blood clots with low platelets after the first dose and no extra risk after the second, a study led and funded by the drugmaker showed on July 28, after worries over side effects.

Scientists are working on a benchmark for Covid-19 vaccine efficacy that would allow drugmakers to conduct smaller, speedier human trials to get them to market and address a huge global vaccine shortage.

University of Oxford researchers started clinical trials for a new vaccine that can potentially target a wide range of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) variants. 

A mixed schedule of vaccines where a shot of Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine is given four weeks after an AstraZeneca shot will produce better immune responses than giving another dose of AstraZeneca, an Oxford study said on June 28.

A third shot of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine produces a strong immune response, researchers said on June 28, adding there was not yet evidence that such shots were needed, especially given shortages in some countries.